Be with Us

 

Asabe has recently been bitten by Rato, and she is suffering from the consequences of the bite. She is in pain and running a fever, and her brother Sallau is unable to contain his screams. Mallam Bahago, a traditional healer, is called in to help Asabe. While Asabe is in pain, she contemplates revenge against Rato, but she is unsure if she will act on her thoughts.

As the story progresses, Asabe’s father, who has been absent for some time, returns to the house. He is not happy with the situation he finds there, and he decides to take action. He tells Sallau to leave the house and go to his right place. He also tells Lia, another member of the household, not to let Sallau come back to the house again.

Asabe’s father’s actions are met with disapproval from Babah Lantana, who believes that the punishment is too severe. She tells Sallau that he should seek revenge for the bite that he received from Rato. Asabe is caught in the middle of the conflict between her father and Babah Lantana.

Later in the story, a stranger arrives at the house. She is called Butulu and claims to be a friend of Babah Lantana. However, her arrival causes tension in the house as she is seen as a threat to the stability of the family. Asabe’s father confronts Butulu, and the two engage in a heated argument. Butulu reveals that she is interested in marrying Asabe’s father, which further complicates the situation.

Throughout the book, Asabe struggles with the conflict between her desire for independence and the traditional expectations of her culture. She is torn between her desire to take revenge on Rato and her respect for the traditions of her culture. Asabe’s father’s actions also challenge her beliefs about the role of men and women in the family.

 

Prologue

I ran through the dark, my heart pounding in my chest. I didn’t know where I was going, but I knew I had to get away. I could hear the footsteps of my pursuer getting closer, and I knew I didn’t have much time.

I turned a corner and saw a light in the distance. I ran towards it, hoping it was a house or a store where I could find help. As I got closer, I saw that it was a mosque. I burst through the doors and ran inside, slamming the door shut behind me.

I looked around and saw that I was in a small room with a few people praying. I didn’t know what to do, so I just stood there, frozen. One of the men saw me and came over.

“What’s wrong?” he asked.

“I’m being chased,” I said. “I need help.”

The man looked at me for a moment, then nodded. “Come with me,” he said.

He led me to a back room and locked the door behind us. “You’ll be safe here,” he said. “Just stay here until the men who are chasing you give up.”

I sat down on the floor and leaned against the wall. I was exhausted and scared, but I was also grateful to the man for helping me. I closed my eyes and tried to calm down.

After a while, I heard the footsteps of the men outside the door. They were talking and laughing, as if they didn’t have a care in the world. I knew they wouldn’t give up easily, but I also knew that I was safe for now.

I took a deep breath and tried to relax. I knew I would have to face the men eventually, but for now, I was just grateful to be alive.

I sat in the back room for a long time, just waiting. I didn’t know how long it would be before the men gave up, but I was determined to stay put. I knew that if I went outside, they would find me.

Finally, after what felt like hours, the footsteps outside the door stopped. I heard the men talking to each other, and then I heard them walking away. I waited a few more minutes, just to be sure, then I opened the door and stepped out.

The mosque was empty. I looked around for the man who had helped me, but he was gone. I was all alone.

I didn’t know what to do. I didn’t have any money, and I didn’t know where I was going. I was scared and alone, but I knew I had to keep going.

I walked out of the mosque and into the street. I didn’t know where I was going, but I knew I had to keep moving. I had to find a way to get home.

Be with Us

HALIN RAYUWA BOOK 3 Hausa Novel Document by Hafsat Sodangi

Halilin Rayuwa Book 3 is a Hausa novel written by Hafsat Sodangi. It tells the story of a young girl named Asabe who is struggling to adapt to the rules and customs of her culture. The book opens with a scene where everyone in the house is at peace except for Babah Lantana, who is struggling with traffic. Babah Lantana is known for her strict adherence to the customs and traditions of the culture, and she often uses them to justify her actions.

Description of HALIN RAYUWA book 3 Hausa Novel

 

Asabe has recently been bitten by Rato, and she is suffering from the consequences of the bite. She is in pain and running a fever, and her brother Sallau is unable to contain his screams. Mallam Bahago, a traditional healer, is called in to help Asabe. While Asabe is in pain, she contemplates revenge against Rato, but she is unsure if she will act on her thoughts.

As the story progresses, Asabe’s father, who has been absent for some time, returns to the house. He is not happy with the situation he finds there, and he decides to take action. He tells Sallau to leave the house and go to his right place. He also tells Lia, another member of the household, not to let Sallau come back to the house again.

Asabe’s father’s actions are met with disapproval from Babah Lantana, who believes that the punishment is too severe. She tells Sallau that he should seek revenge for the bite that he received from Rato. Asabe is caught in the middle of the conflict between her father and Babah Lantana.

Later in the story, a stranger arrives at the house. She is called Butulu and claims to be a friend of Babah Lantana. However, her arrival causes tension in the house as she is seen as a threat to the stability of the family. Asabe’s father confronts Butulu, and the two engage in a heated argument. Butulu reveals that she is interested in marrying Asabe’s father, which further complicates the situation.

Throughout the book, Asabe struggles with the conflict between her desire for independence and the traditional expectations of her culture. She is torn between her desire to take revenge on Rato and her respect for the traditions of her culture. Asabe’s father’s actions also challenge her beliefs about the role of men and women in the family.

 

Prologue

I ran through the dark, my heart pounding in my chest. I didn’t know where I was going, but I knew I had to get away. I could hear the footsteps of my pursuer getting closer, and I knew I didn’t have much time.

I turned a corner and saw a light in the distance. I ran towards it, hoping it was a house or a store where I could find help. As I got closer, I saw that it was a mosque. I burst through the doors and ran inside, slamming the door shut behind me.

I looked around and saw that I was in a small room with a few people praying. I didn’t know what to do, so I just stood there, frozen. One of the men saw me and came over.

“What’s wrong?” he asked.

“I’m being chased,” I said. “I need help.”

The man looked at me for a moment, then nodded. “Come with me,” he said.

He led me to a back room and locked the door behind us. “You’ll be safe here,” he said. “Just stay here until the men who are chasing you give up.”

I sat down on the floor and leaned against the wall. I was exhausted and scared, but I was also grateful to the man for helping me. I closed my eyes and tried to calm down.

After a while, I heard the footsteps of the men outside the door. They were talking and laughing, as if they didn’t have a care in the world. I knew they wouldn’t give up easily, but I also knew that I was safe for now.

I took a deep breath and tried to relax. I knew I would have to face the men eventually, but for now, I was just grateful to be alive.

I sat in the back room for a long time, just waiting. I didn’t know how long it would be before the men gave up, but I was determined to stay put. I knew that if I went outside, they would find me.

Finally, after what felt like hours, the footsteps outside the door stopped. I heard the men talking to each other, and then I heard them walking away. I waited a few more minutes, just to be sure, then I opened the door and stepped out.

The mosque was empty. I looked around for the man who had helped me, but he was gone. I was all alone.

I didn’t know what to do. I didn’t have any money, and I didn’t know where I was going. I was scared and alone, but I knew I had to keep going.

I walked out of the mosque and into the street. I didn’t know where I was going, but I knew I had to keep moving. I had to find a way to get home.

Be with Us

HALIN RAYUWA BOOK 3 Hausa Novel Document by Hafsat Sodangi

Halilin Rayuwa Book 3 is a Hausa novel written by Hafsat Sodangi. It tells the story of a young girl named Asabe who is struggling to adapt to the rules and customs of her culture. The book opens with a scene where everyone in the house is at peace except for Babah Lantana, who is struggling with traffic. Babah Lantana is known for her strict adherence to the customs and traditions of the culture, and she often uses them to justify her actions.

Description of HALIN RAYUWA book 3 Hausa Novel

 

Asabe has recently been bitten by Rato, and she is suffering from the consequences of the bite. She is in pain and running a fever, and her brother Sallau is unable to contain his screams. Mallam Bahago, a traditional healer, is called in to help Asabe. While Asabe is in pain, she contemplates revenge against Rato, but she is unsure if she will act on her thoughts.

As the story progresses, Asabe’s father, who has been absent for some time, returns to the house. He is not happy with the situation he finds there, and he decides to take action. He tells Sallau to leave the house and go to his right place. He also tells Lia, another member of the household, not to let Sallau come back to the house again.

Asabe’s father’s actions are met with disapproval from Babah Lantana, who believes that the punishment is too severe. She tells Sallau that he should seek revenge for the bite that he received from Rato. Asabe is caught in the middle of the conflict between her father and Babah Lantana.

Later in the story, a stranger arrives at the house. She is called Butulu and claims to be a friend of Babah Lantana. However, her arrival causes tension in the house as she is seen as a threat to the stability of the family. Asabe’s father confronts Butulu, and the two engage in a heated argument. Butulu reveals that she is interested in marrying Asabe’s father, which further complicates the situation.

Throughout the book, Asabe struggles with the conflict between her desire for independence and the traditional expectations of her culture. She is torn between her desire to take revenge on Rato and her respect for the traditions of her culture. Asabe’s father’s actions also challenge her beliefs about the role of men and women in the family.

 

Prologue

I ran through the dark, my heart pounding in my chest. I didn’t know where I was going, but I knew I had to get away. I could hear the footsteps of my pursuer getting closer, and I knew I didn’t have much time.

I turned a corner and saw a light in the distance. I ran towards it, hoping it was a house or a store where I could find help. As I got closer, I saw that it was a mosque. I burst through the doors and ran inside, slamming the door shut behind me.

I looked around and saw that I was in a small room with a few people praying. I didn’t know what to do, so I just stood there, frozen. One of the men saw me and came over.

“What’s wrong?” he asked.

“I’m being chased,” I said. “I need help.”

The man looked at me for a moment, then nodded. “Come with me,” he said.

He led me to a back room and locked the door behind us. “You’ll be safe here,” he said. “Just stay here until the men who are chasing you give up.”

I sat down on the floor and leaned against the wall. I was exhausted and scared, but I was also grateful to the man for helping me. I closed my eyes and tried to calm down.

After a while, I heard the footsteps of the men outside the door. They were talking and laughing, as if they didn’t have a care in the world. I knew they wouldn’t give up easily, but I also knew that I was safe for now.

I took a deep breath and tried to relax. I knew I would have to face the men eventually, but for now, I was just grateful to be alive.

I sat in the back room for a long time, just waiting. I didn’t know how long it would be before the men gave up, but I was determined to stay put. I knew that if I went outside, they would find me.

Finally, after what felt like hours, the footsteps outside the door stopped. I heard the men talking to each other, and then I heard them walking away. I waited a few more minutes, just to be sure, then I opened the door and stepped out.

The mosque was empty. I looked around for the man who had helped me, but he was gone. I was all alone.

I didn’t know what to do. I didn’t have any money, and I didn’t know where I was going. I was scared and alone, but I knew I had to keep going.

I walked out of the mosque and into the street. I didn’t know where I was going, but I knew I had to keep moving. I had to find a way to get home.

Be with Us

HALIN RAYUWA BOOK 3 Hausa Novel Document by Hafsat Sodangi

Halilin Rayuwa Book 3 is a Hausa novel written by Hafsat Sodangi. It tells the story of a young girl named Asabe who is struggling to adapt to the rules and customs of her culture. The book opens with a scene where everyone in the house is at peace except for Babah Lantana, who is struggling with traffic. Babah Lantana is known for her strict adherence to the customs and traditions of the culture, and she often uses them to justify her actions.

Description of HALIN RAYUWA book 3 Hausa Novel

 

Asabe has recently been bitten by Rato, and she is suffering from the consequences of the bite. She is in pain and running a fever, and her brother Sallau is unable to contain his screams. Mallam Bahago, a traditional healer, is called in to help Asabe. While Asabe is in pain, she contemplates revenge against Rato, but she is unsure if she will act on her thoughts.

As the story progresses, Asabe’s father, who has been absent for some time, returns to the house. He is not happy with the situation he finds there, and he decides to take action. He tells Sallau to leave the house and go to his right place. He also tells Lia, another member of the household, not to let Sallau come back to the house again.

Asabe’s father’s actions are met with disapproval from Babah Lantana, who believes that the punishment is too severe. She tells Sallau that he should seek revenge for the bite that he received from Rato. Asabe is caught in the middle of the conflict between her father and Babah Lantana.

Later in the story, a stranger arrives at the house. She is called Butulu and claims to be a friend of Babah Lantana. However, her arrival causes tension in the house as she is seen as a threat to the stability of the family. Asabe’s father confronts Butulu, and the two engage in a heated argument. Butulu reveals that she is interested in marrying Asabe’s father, which further complicates the situation.

Throughout the book, Asabe struggles with the conflict between her desire for independence and the traditional expectations of her culture. She is torn between her desire to take revenge on Rato and her respect for the traditions of her culture. Asabe’s father’s actions also challenge her beliefs about the role of men and women in the family.

 

Prologue

I ran through the dark, my heart pounding in my chest. I didn’t know where I was going, but I knew I had to get away. I could hear the footsteps of my pursuer getting closer, and I knew I didn’t have much time.

I turned a corner and saw a light in the distance. I ran towards it, hoping it was a house or a store where I could find help. As I got closer, I saw that it was a mosque. I burst through the doors and ran inside, slamming the door shut behind me.

I looked around and saw that I was in a small room with a few people praying. I didn’t know what to do, so I just stood there, frozen. One of the men saw me and came over.

“What’s wrong?” he asked.

“I’m being chased,” I said. “I need help.”

The man looked at me for a moment, then nodded. “Come with me,” he said.

He led me to a back room and locked the door behind us. “You’ll be safe here,” he said. “Just stay here until the men who are chasing you give up.”

I sat down on the floor and leaned against the wall. I was exhausted and scared, but I was also grateful to the man for helping me. I closed my eyes and tried to calm down.

After a while, I heard the footsteps of the men outside the door. They were talking and laughing, as if they didn’t have a care in the world. I knew they wouldn’t give up easily, but I also knew that I was safe for now.

I took a deep breath and tried to relax. I knew I would have to face the men eventually, but for now, I was just grateful to be alive.

I sat in the back room for a long time, just waiting. I didn’t know how long it would be before the men gave up, but I was determined to stay put. I knew that if I went outside, they would find me.

Finally, after what felt like hours, the footsteps outside the door stopped. I heard the men talking to each other, and then I heard them walking away. I waited a few more minutes, just to be sure, then I opened the door and stepped out.

The mosque was empty. I looked around for the man who had helped me, but he was gone. I was all alone.

I didn’t know what to do. I didn’t have any money, and I didn’t know where I was going. I was scared and alone, but I knew I had to keep going.

I walked out of the mosque and into the street. I didn’t know where I was going, but I knew I had to keep moving. I had to find a way to get home.

Be with Us

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *